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William Wordsworth

Desideria

SURPRISED by joy—impatient as the Wind
    I turned to share the transport—O! with whom
    But Thee, deep buried in the silent tomb,
That spot which no vicissitude can find?
Love, faithful love, recall’d thee to my mind—
    But how could I forget thee? Through what power,
    Even for the least division of an hour,
Have I been so beguiled as to be blind
To my most grievous loss?—That thought’s return
    Was the worst pang that sorrow ever bore,
Save one, one only, when I stood forlorn,
    Knowing my heart’s best treasure was no more;
That neither present time, nor years unborn
    Could to my sight that heavenly face restore.

 
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About the poet
William Wordsworth
 
By the same poet
Upon Westminster Bridge
The Reaper
Daffodils
Lucy (i)
Lucy (ii)
Lucy (iii)
Lucy (iv)
Lucy (v)
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On the Extinction of the Venetian Republic, 1802
England, 1802 (i)
England, 1802 (ii)
England, 1802 (iii)
England, 1802 (iv)
England, 1802 (v)
Perfect Woman
Ode to Duty
The Rainbow
The Sonnet (i)
The Sonnet (ii)
The World
Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood
Valedictory Sonnet to the River Duddon
Mutability
The Trosachs
Speak!
 
Related books
William Wordsworth at amazon.com


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