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William Wordsworth

Speak!

WHY art thou silent! Is thy love a plant
    Of such weak fibre that the treacherous air
    Of absence withers what was once so fair?
Is there no debt to pay, no boon to grant?
Yet have my thoughts for thee been vigilant—
    Bound to thy service with unceasing care,
The mind's least generous wish a mendicant
    For nought but what thy happiness could spare.
Speak—though this soft warm heart, once free to hold
    A thousand tender pleasures, thine and mine,
Be left more desolate, more dreary cold
    Than a forsaken bird's-nest filled with snow
    'Mid its own bush of leafless eglantine—
    Speak, that my torturing doubts their end may know!

 
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About the poet
William Wordsworth
 
By the same poet
Desideria
Upon Westminster Bridge
The Reaper
Daffodils
Lucy (i)
Lucy (ii)
Lucy (iii)
Lucy (iv)
Lucy (v)
Evening on Calais Beach
On the Extinction of the Venetian Republic, 1802
England, 1802 (i)
England, 1802 (ii)
England, 1802 (iii)
England, 1802 (iv)
England, 1802 (v)
Perfect Woman
Ode to Duty
The Rainbow
The Sonnet (i)
The Sonnet (ii)
The World
Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood
Valedictory Sonnet to the River Duddon
Mutability
The Trosachs
 
Related books
William Wordsworth at amazon.com


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