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William Wordsworth

England, 1802

iv

IT is not to be thought of that the flood
    Of British freedom, which, to the open sea
    Of the world's praise, from dark antiquity
Hath flow'd, 'with pomp of waters, unwithstood,'
Roused though it be full often to a mood
    Which spurns the check of salutary bands,—
    That this most famous stream in bogs and sands
Should perish; and to evil and to good
Be lost for ever. In our halls is hung
    Armoury of the invincible Knights of old:
We must be free or die, who speak the tongue
    That Shakespeare spake; the faith and morals hold
Which Milton held.—In everything we are sprung
    Of Earth's first blood, have titles manifold.

 
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About the poet
William Wordsworth
 
By the same poet
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Upon Westminster Bridge
The Reaper
Daffodils
Lucy (i)
Lucy (ii)
Lucy (iii)
Lucy (iv)
Lucy (v)
Evening on Calais Beach
On the Extinction of the Venetian Republic, 1802
England, 1802 (i)
England, 1802 (ii)
England, 1802 (iii)
England, 1802 (v)
Perfect Woman
Ode to Duty
The Rainbow
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The Sonnet (ii)
The World
Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood
Valedictory Sonnet to the River Duddon
Mutability
The Trosachs
Speak!
 
Related books
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