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William Wordsworth

England, 1802

iii

GREAT men have been among us; hands that penn'd
    And tongues that utter'd wisdom—better none:
    The later Sidney, Marvel, Harrington,
Young Vane, and others who call'd Milton friend.
These moralists could act and comprehend:
    They knew how genuine glory was put on;
    Taught us how rightfully a nation shone
In splendour: what strength was, that would not bend
But in magnanimous meekness. France, 'tis strange,
    Hath brought forth no such souls as we had then.
Perpetual emptiness! unceasing change!
    No single volume paramount, no code,
    No master spirit, no determined road;
    But equally a want of books and men!

 
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About the poet
William Wordsworth
 
By the same poet
Desideria
Upon Westminster Bridge
The Reaper
Daffodils
Lucy (i)
Lucy (ii)
Lucy (iii)
Lucy (iv)
Lucy (v)
Evening on Calais Beach
On the Extinction of the Venetian Republic, 1802
England, 1802 (i)
England, 1802 (ii)
England, 1802 (iv)
England, 1802 (v)
Perfect Woman
Ode to Duty
The Rainbow
The Sonnet (i)
The Sonnet (ii)
The World
Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood
Valedictory Sonnet to the River Duddon
Mutability
The Trosachs
Speak!
 
Related books
William Wordsworth at amazon.com


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