englishverse.com
HomePoetsPoemsBooks
 

William Shakespeare

Sonnet i

SHALL I compare thee to a summer's day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate.
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And summer's lease hath all too short a date.

Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And often is his gold complexion dimmed,
And every fair from fair sometimes declines,
By chance or nature's changing course untrimmed;

But thy eternal summer shall not fade,
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st,
Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade,
When in eternal lines to time thou grow'st.

So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.

 
Sponsored link
To advertise here, please contact us.
 
About the poet
William Shakespeare
 
By the same poet
Sonnet ii
Sonnet iii
Sonnet iv
Sonnet v
Sonnet vi
Sonnet vii
Sonnet viii
Sonnet ix
Sonnet x
Sonnet xi
Sonnet xii
Sonnet xiii
Sonnet xiv
Sonnet xv
Sonnet xvi
Sonnet xvii
Sonnet xviii
Sonnet xix
Sonnet xx
Carpe Diem
Silvia
The Blossom
Spring and Winter (i)
Spring and Winter (ii)
Fairy Land (i)
Fairy Land (ii)
Fairy Land (iii)
Fairy Land (iv)
Fairy Land (v)
Love
Dirge
Under the Greenwood Tree
Blow, blow, thou Winter Wind
It was a Lover and his Lass
Take, O take those Lips away
Aubade
Fidele
The Phoenix and the Turtle
 
Related books
The Arden Shakespeare: Shakespeare's Sonnets, William Shakespeare, Katherine Duncan-Jones (Editor)
Shakespeare's Sonnets (Penguin Classics), William Shakespeare
The Complete Sonnets [AUDIOBOOK], William Shakespeare, Michael Williams (Narrator), Peter Egan (Narrator), Peter Orr (Narrator), Bob Peck (Narrator)
William Shakespeare at amazon.com


Home  .  Poets  .  Poems  .  Books  .  Site preferences  .  Contact

English  .  Français

© 2003-2006 Waverley Internet Design. All rights reserved.